• Transform magazine
  • June 16, 2019

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#TransformTuesday: 2 February

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Every week, Transform examines recent rebrands and updated visual identities. This week's picks are below. For more from #TransformTuesday, follow @Transformsays

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US domestic airline carrier Alaska Airlines has carried out its first major rebrand for 25 years. Seattle-based advertising agency Hornall Anderson worked with the airline to create the new design, including implementing a typeface to replace its original font which resembled icicles. Streamlining the historic font and adding a refreshed colour scheme to the iconic Eskimo that adorns the aeroplane tail, Alaska Airlines’ new visual identity is a celebration of the expansion enjoyed by the company in recent years. The new design is also intended to be more compatible with mobile and tablet devices, while creating a warmth to the brand which may previously have been absent.

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Focused on the insurance claims sector, Claims Club Asia has rebranded to become Claims Club Asia-Pacific, in a bid to create a more unifying identity with its Australian branch. The previous italicised logo has been replaced by two capital Cs; a colour change from gold to red and grey now lends the brand a more corporate feel. The previous bold logo typeface has also been replaced with a simplified serif font, allowing the organisation’s new name to fit comfortably into its logo space.

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International wealth management firm formerly known as Crédit Agricole Private Banking has rebranded in a bid to unify its global operations. Now named Indosuez Wealth Management, this extensive rebrand encompasses Europe, the Middle East, Asia Pacific and the Americas, aiming to create a single identity for its international client base. The new logo retains its original text and imagery, albeit under a greyscale colour scheme, eschewing the splash of turquoise to lend the firm a more sophisticated feel. The text has also been streamlined to create a rectangular shape, reinforcing its efficient and historic brand qualities.   

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Employing the experience of branding agency Coley Porter Bell, Tesco has rebranded its ‘Free From’ range to cement it as an industry leader in the provision of allergy-free products. The range, which retains its bold and eye-catching purple colour scheme, also aims to be ‘free from compromise’. Images on the packaging are of a higher-quality than the previous design, intended to reinforce this message and make a clear distinction in quality between Tesco and other supermarket brands. A new text colour-coding system has also been implemented to clearly detail which allergen(s) the product is free from.

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The South-East Asian counterpart to Uber, GrabTaxi, is attempting to penetrate its regional market. through a largely in-house rebrand, it has become known, simply, as Grab. Aligning itself with the recently launched Grab mobile app, the taxi service’s new visual identity is intended to represent the journey the company has been on since it was launched in 2012. The rebrand is also a reflection of the company’s financial success. Black font in the previous logo has been dropped in favour of a soft green background to emphasise the white ‘roads’, a component of the new typeface. The redesign is also much simpler, with a lack of imagery ensuring the new logo is clear, professional and instantly recognisable.

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Privately-owned biscuit company Border Biscuits has changed its visual identity to become a brand-led, rather than product-led, biscuit retailer. Brand design agency Coley Porter Bell was employed to emphasise the biscuit’s brand qualities which weren’t obvious through the original packaging - a fairly standard design across the product range. The whole collection has now been given a unifying design, while the ‘personalities’ of each product are communicated through individual touches to each product packaging. The newly developed colour schemes and illustrations are also intended to represent the passion and care that goes into baking each batch of biscuits.